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School and training center "Ecole Polyvalente Carolus Magnus" (Burundi)

EPCM school in Burundi provides excellent primary and secondary education to girls and boys from mostly rural and therefore poorer families. Almost 1.000 children attend the school and prepare for their future.

P. Ziser from Burundikids e.V.Write a message

EPCM school provides general education plus the opportunity to specialize in a technical subject for college (after the tenth form). There is a primary school and a secondary school enabeling students to pass the school leaving exam (in German: 'Abitur'; similar to British A-level).

As for the technical diploma (German: Fachabitur) students can choose between pharmacy assistant training, laboratory, hospital nurse training or bank and assurance management. For the practical training within the pharmacy assistant programme, the school provides several laboratories. The number of girls and boys attending EPCM is up to 1.000. 

As a matter of principle, every child and every young person can attend EPCM. For primary school and for college they simply have to register. However, those who wish to attend technical vocational education, must have successfully completed 10th form, and they have to pass an entry exam.

EPCM is situated in the quarter of Kajaga, about 15 km north of Burundi's economic capital Bujumbura. At present, the EPCM consists of three building blocks. In one part of the building primary school is situated, separated from college and the technical school with its laboratories in the other part. The third builing is for the computer room, a library and more class rooms.

By the way, the school's name goes back to Charlemagne, the German Emperor (lat. Carolus Magnus) who introduced and developed the school system in ancient Germany – he was a great agent for education.

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