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Flood relief, reforestation, well construction in south MALAWI

Landkreis Tengani, Malawi

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Flood relief, reforestation, well construction in south MALAWI

Landkreis Tengani, Malawi

Reconstruction of stable houses after cyclone Idai! Well remediation and reforestation on wastelands in Malawi against thirst, hunger and poverty, reclaiming land for food and fruit growing for local needs. Wanted! Your help!

B. Uhlig from Active Aid in Africa e.V. | 
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About this project

Additionally to the rehabilitation of older bore holes, Active Aid in Africa is reforesting the southernmost province of the state of Malawi. We plant fast-growing, endemic pioneer trees: Jatropha, Neem and Moringa (JA-NEE-MO), which handle the climatic conditions very well. All that tree species form a widely distributed root system, which stabilizes the soil and protects against erosion. In addition, the cross roots store the rainwater nearby the surface. Meanwhile, AAA Malawi is also planting fruit trees.

The area has not always been so desolate. When explorer David Livingstone passed our location exactly 160 years ago, the area looked completely different: wet savanna with large bushes and forests spread throughout the area. Large animals such as antelopes and elephants were widespread here. Until the end of the colonial era in the 1960s, the area remained largely untouched.

The Nsanje district, in total just as big as the small Saarland, is surrounded on three sides by the big neighbor Mozambique. During the nearly 20-year civil starting from the 1970s, the Mozambicans escaped into Malawi, their peaceful neighbor. Over 2 million civil war refugees joined the approximately 200,000 native Malawians over time. The refugees lived in huge tent camps. The trees and shrubs were cleared because people needed space and firewood. When the war ended in the early 1990s, people returned to Mozambique and left the Malawians back with a semi-desert. The floors were left vulnerable to erosion by water and wind.

Thanks to our first planting actions, small groves have been created. Some people in the villages have already planted fruit trees.

In the AAA-owned nursery, the permanent hired gardeners are currently raising the second generation of about 40,000 seedlings. During the raining season, our gardeners put the plants onto the open field to reforest a large part of the area of ​​8 hectares belonging to our project, but also many plots of land in other municipalities of the district.

But we want to reforest much more because there are thousands of hectares of waste land in our district. For this to become possible, we need your help.
 
 Lower Shire Valley is hit particularly hard by devastating storms and floods, but also droughts, most recently in early 2019. People who cannot help themselves are still waiting for help for their broken houses, roofs. AAA Malawi helps them.
 
Please to everyone, help for our environment and to slow down  the climate change.